Jumat, 15 April 2011

Mind Stimulation for Your Dog

Do you come home from work and find your garbage strewn all over the house? Are there holes dug all over the yard? Do you find chew marks on your furniture? Has the stuffing been pulled out of your couch? Are all of these and other naughty things being done by your lovable pet pooch? The cause is simple. Your pet is bored! 

Now a more challenging question; what do you do about it? All dogs need to do more than eat, sleep and love you. All dogs need exercise to start with. A walk isn't just about having a pee or a poop. A walk is a fabulous way to build a strong bond between you and your dog, and an opportunity to demonstrate to your pet that YOU are the leader. As Cesar Millan, the dog whisperer, would say, "YOU need to be the Pack Leader". Remember that when you walk your dog, you should be the first one out of the house, the first one back into the house, and your dog should walk beside you or slightly behind you. 

I know that we all love our dogs and often think of them as our children... our babies. Truth be told, in order to provide your pet with what he/she truly needs it is important that you think of your dog first as a dog, and then consider the characteristics of the breed. Then you need to remember that your pet is also an individual. 

Some breeds need more physical exercise than others. Some need more exercise than others. Herding dogs, as an example, were bred to herd or move livestock. This "job" requires intelligence and an enormous amount of running and endurance. There are dozens of breeds belonging to the "herding" family of dogs including the various types of Sheep dogs and Shepherd dogs, Collies, and Giant Schnauzers to name a few. Other breeds like Jack Russell Terriers, Shelties, and sporting dogs, although not herding breeds, are high energy breeds; requiring more exercise than some lower energy breeds. Think in terms of a 5 mile RUN (not walk) each day as a guide. Also, you can ride a bike or roller blade while your pet keeps up beside you. 

On the other side of the spectrum; Poodles, Terriers, Shih Tzus, Schnauzers, Bull Dogs, and Pugs, for example have a much lower demand for exercise. Understand that these dogs still need to be walked, at least once each day for at least one hour. 

You'll know if your dog is getting enough exercise based on its' behaviour and weight. If your dog is gaining weight you're either feeding him way too much, offering too many treats, or not giving him enough exercise. If your dogs' weight is fine and he's behaving, then the exercise that you're giving him is likely sufficient. Remember, too, that older dogs will need less exercise than puppies. If there is any question or concern, get advice from your Vet. 

One thing to note about walks is that you do NOT want the walk to be about your dogs' bathroom duties. Dogs absolutely LOVE their walks. If the walk is over immediately after the dog does his "business", he will try to hold it so the walk will last longer. In fact he may wait until you give up and go home, then do his business in the house. It will work better for you if you wait for the dog to "potty", and then reward that behaviour with a one hour walk. 

If you have some reason that you're not able to provide your dog with the kind of walks he requires, there are a couple of things you can do. For high energy dogs you can put a back pack on them filled with water bottles. The extra weight will add more of a challenge on their walk and tire them out quicker. You can also consider purchasing a treadmill. There are treadmills designed specifically for dogs that can also accommodate the speed that your canine companion needs. When using this type of device please do NOT leave your pet unattended. Any number of accidents can occur if no one is watching. Besides, you can still use the "pack leader" attitude and strengthen your bond while your dog is on the treadmill. 

Now that covers the dog walking part of this segment. Here's another newsflash. Dogs also need to be mentally stimulated. Again, the amount of stimulation necessary is dependent on the breed and the individual dog. If there's any question or concern, remember your Vet is an excellent resource and can guide you appropriately. 

Mental stimulation can take numerous forms. Rough housing with your pet can help to stimulate them mentally; as does training. Once they're completely "behaviour" trained, you can work on fun tricks. Playing catch or fetch is also helpful. These activities can be fun for both of you, enhance the bond between you, and keep your pets mind active. You can also consider agility training for all the same reasons. NOTE that before you begin any serious, intense regimen you should consult your pets' Veterinarian. Some agility drills can be harmful for your dog under certain conditions; like dogs suffering from arthritis, hip or joint problems, or young pups. Agility drills involving a lot of jumping can be too stressful for young developing joints. Intense weaves are another obstacle you'll want to be careful of when training your puppy. 

Swimming is a great activity for your dog. Most dogs enjoy it; it's good exercise and builds strength. You can have a lot of fun with your dog while swimming. It can also be easier on the joints of an older dog. Again, please check with your best resource, your Vet to make sure this is a good activity for your specific dog. There may be a health issue that would be aggravated by a particular activity. I know, like any good parent, you want what's best for your pet. 

Remember to hug your dog today. 

by: Brigitte Synesael-http://www.fabulouspetsupplies.com

Golden Retriever Adoption – Does A Puppy Or An Older Dog Make A Better Family Pet?

Your family has finally reached a time in their lives where getting a pet seems like a good idea. You all agree that a Golden Retriever adoption might be perfect for your family and now left with the decision of whether or not to adopt a puppy or an older dog. 

While you have no doubt heard from several sources that choosing an older dog for your Golden Retriever adoption can give that dog a second chance for a family and a happy life, you have also no doubt heard horror stories about rescue dogs that have come into families with a series of problems that make them less than perfect family pets. On the other hand, you have also probably heard stories about dogs that have been with the same family since weaning that have also exhibited behavior problems as well. So, the question remains, which would make a better pet for your family, a new Golden Retriever puppy or an adult dog. 

The answer really depends on your family. If you have very young children an adult dog of this breed just may be ideal for your family for several reasons. First, with an adult dog you can make a good assessment of the dog's individual temperament. While Goldens are known for their friendly and gentle personalities, it doesn't mean every dog of this breed will have that quality. So, it is something you want to really consider if you have young children. Older people too find that choosing an older dog in their Golden Retriever adoption often works out better than adopting a puppy would. It all depends on your situation. 

While some breeds of dogs are loyal to just one person, this is not true of this particular breed. These dogs may be equally friendly to family members and strangers alike, which means that they are a breed that can adjust well to new owners and new homes with very little effort or trouble. However, this will depend on just what type of treatment they have received in the past. So, if you are adopting an older dog, learn as much of its history as possible. Keep in mind that rescues are not the only place to get older Golden's. Many times breeders have older dogs up for Golden Retriever adoption and can give you a complete history of these dogs. 

Families with older children who have the time and patience to train and care for a puppy through that puppy stage may well prefer a younger dog or a small puppy. There is something to be said for the experience of working with and training a dog from puppyhood and there is a certain satisfaction that comes with such bonding and training.

However, if you are considering a puppy for your Golden Retriever adoption, take your time and do a bit of research. Either adopt from a reputable breeder or find a rescue that may have pups that they are looking to place. Of course, if your main goal is to have a show dog for a pet, then a puppy is definitely the way to go. 

If you are not planning on showing your dog, and if your ultimate goal is to have a healthy and fun pet to love and care for, then either a pup or an older dog will work well in your Golden Retriever adoption. In either case giving a dog a loving home and having the companionship of a Golden Retriever can be a rewarding experience.

by: James Drake-http://www.golden-retriever-guide.com

Puppy Training

Is puppy training absolutely necessary? 

As anyone who owns a dog will know, if you train a dog early enough it will save you time and money in the long run, not to mention it adding a few years to your life by avoiding unnecessary stress. A dog can be almost as time consuming as having a child. Puppy training is a must for anyone, unless you want to be chasing your dog down the road or changing your carpets on a yearly basis, you won't think twice about it. You and your dog will benefit from puppy training and the household in general will be a lot better off. 

Can't I just do the puppy training myself? 

Many people make the mistake of thinking they can do the puppy training themselves. It is not impossible of course, however most people would benefit from taking the dog to the professionals for the puppy training. It isn't just the dog that needs training; it is also the dog owner. The professionals know exactly what they are doing and have seen every scenario there is. Like humans, each dog is an individual, and the dog trainers can mould each training session to each dogs needs. 

Where is the best place to go for puppy training? 

Of course there are lots of excellent places to go for puppy training. It would be advisable that wherever you go, the puppy training firm belongs to the Association of pet Dog Trainers. There is one company that stands out amongst the others as a first class place to go to get your dog trained. The name of the firm I am referring to is www.ck9training.co.uk. They are very professional and will be sure to make any naughty little dog into a well behaved creature.

 by: Gareth Hoyle-http://www.ck9training.co.uk

Bringing a new puppy into your home?

Bringing a new puppy into your home? 

Puppies will grow up very quickly. Know how to train them right and they will become a good natured and well-mannered adult dog. 

Before You Search For A Puppy 

Before you get a new puppy, make sure you know exactly what kind of puppy to look for and how to raise and train him. 

Deciding Which Type of Puppy 

The breed, type, size, activity level, hair color, hair length, and gender of your prospective puppy are personal choices and best left entirely up to you and your family. You will probably have read lots of well-meaning advice from pet professionals that advise you, for example, not to get certain breeds if you have children, not to get large dogs if you live in an apartment, and not to get active dogs in the city. In reality, all breeds and types of dogs can be wonderful or problematic with children. It very much depends on whether or not the puppy was trained how to act around children and the children were taught how to act around the puppy. Because of their lower activity levels, large dogs adapt more quickly to apartment living than little dogs. Big dogs just take up more space. And active dogs can live in cities just as active people live in cities. In fact, city dogs tend to be walked and exercised more than suburban dogs. In the long run, it will be you who will be living with your puppy and teaching it to adjust to your lifestyle and living arrangement. 

Selecting Your Individual Puppy 

It is vital however, in your puppy search that you know how to evaluate whether your prospective puppy is physically and mentally healthy. Research your prospective puppy's lineage to confirm that his grandparents and great-grandparents all lived to a ripe old age, and to check how many of his doggy family suffered from breed-specific problems. Long life is the best indicator of overall physical and behavioral health and the best predictor that your puppy will have a long life expectancy. Research well and most of all, please take your decision to get a puppy seriously. Each year, several million dogs are abandoned, given to shelters and euthanized, almost entirely because easily preventable and utterly predictable puppy problems were allowed to develop into much more difficult to resolve adult behavior, training and temperament problems. Train your new puppy and you will have a well behaved, loveable, forever family member!

by: Ramk-http://www.puppydogpost.com